About Film Strip Accessories

Lights, camera, action

Recycle | Re-use | Re-purpose

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The film used in these products is re-purposed from 35mm Mylar (polyester) movies that ran in theaters between 2006 and 2012 (when digital took over). Prior to digital movies, distributors picked up the 35mm film movies after their run in theaters and paid to have it destroyed, as all the copies of films in the thousands of theaters across the country could not be archived or sent to other theaters to be shown, and destroying the films would help keep them from being pirated.

We negotiated an agreement with the distributors to give us a few reels from each movie (but not the entire film) instead of paying to have it professionally destroyed. They agreed because when it is made into something it is technically “destroyed” because it can no longer be watched as a movie, BUT YOU CAN STILL SEE THE SCENES IN YOUR DEJA ITEMS!

All Handbags and Accessories Handmade - Since 2008

HOW IT ALL STARTED

Years ago, I had a friend who was a projectionist in a theater. She gave me a trailer of my favorite movie back then, Slumdog Millionaire. She told me that the theater had lots of trailers left over and that they usually threw them away or employees took them home to make crafts using the film.

The Slumdog Millionaire trailer sat on my coffee table for a few months until my friend’s birthday rolled around. I fancied crochet and since she was a projectionist, I tried my hand at crocheting her a little purse out of the film as it seemed a perfect gift for her! The film was also a perfect material to crochet since it had pre-punched holes along the edges of the film and the frames of the movie were easily seen. Each frame was a positive image, not a negative image, so they looked exactly like you would see them on the big screen, when you hold it up to the light, only much smaller.

She loved her purse, and it was her who introduced me to the distributors. Before I met the distributors, I made the two men a couple of ties using the film. They loved them too, and the rest is history!

Julie Lewis​, Owner

How Durable is it?

It is extremely durable because it is Mylar film, not celluloid or silver nitrate. A purse made of Mylar film can carry several pounds of weight, up to 7-10 lbs in styles that are large enough to carry that much stuff. It will not crack or show fingerprints and it is impossible to tear. The yarn that is used to crochet the strips together is extra strong mercerized cotton and the stitch is one that is used when items need to be especially robust.

CLICK ON PHOTO TO WATCH VIDEO

Isn’t it Flammable?

No! Flammable Silver Nitrate film was used in the 1920’s to early 1950’s.
When theaters caught fire it was due to the extreme flammability of silver nitrate in the film. When the industry tired of theaters burning down from just the heat of the light shining on the film during projection, they switched to another celluloid film which did not contain silver nitrate. That composition lasted until the mid 90’s when the industry discovered Mylar. Mylar film is not only durable, but non-flammable. In 2012 the industry turned totally digital. Deja Bags offers items in Mylar film fashions! However, we do offer a few celluloid films from the 70’s (lined with clear Mylar to make them more durable) . Some are classic films such as “Being There” with Peter Sellers as well as “Pink Panther”, and others are adult films from the 70’s; please see “Adults Only” tab to view the offerings.

Why am I seeing blue stripes?

On most of our accessories, you will see a blue edging on one or both sides of the film strips. What you are seeing is the soundtrack of the movie.

On many of our products this will appear to be a blue stripe in the product.

Who Makes these products?

The products were initially all handmade by just two people, myself and one other. But due to high demand we could not keep up with making them ourselves. Therefore, we now have them made by a women’s cooperative in the Philippines who were displaced from the earthquake in 2010 in Manilla. The women are paid fairly, boosting both the economy and their individual self esteem.

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